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Author: 



Meads, T. 



Title: 



The store that Meads 
keeps, profusely... 

Place: 

Marquette, [Mich. 

Date: 

1876 



MASTER NEGATIVE # 



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ORIGINAL MATERIAL AS FILMED - EXISTING BIBLIOGRAPHIC RECORD 



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The store thikt Meade keeps, profusely eabel- 
lished b/ Kerno* Marquette (Mloh*} 1876« 
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Sailing over the broud. clear waters of Lake ' Superior, trullinir 
fur the U\r<re 20 pound hike trout, beating the niuuntain streams for 
speckled trout, visiting the rulling mill, lurnaces, mines and other 
objects of interest will serve to pass away several weeks if. an 
anuising and i)rotitable manner. The hotels here are well kept, 
vc:y comfortable and charges reasonable, and amongst other at- 
tractive features we call attention to the following sketch, frc n> the 
Jfhiimj Jounml, of the new jfark and cemetery: 

'•The people of Manpictte are remarkal)lj well favored with the 
grand in nature— in the hills and valleys, the swift flowing river 
and the rivulet, the exi)anse of lake and stretch of shore line, the 
rising i>lain and unnumbered tints of loliage, by which the city is 
surrcmnded. It would be difficult to select a point which (»tfers a 
greater <livcrsity of striking and beautiful scenery, in the midst of 
a moving c(»mnierce which is asserting itself as the most jKnverful 
in the world, A finer ])icture never covered the canvas of an artist 
than is presented by Manpiette from the center ot the bay, with 
tlie docks, and ships and steamers in the foreground, bustling with 
life, and the city dropping from the highland to the right and left on 
both cides of the bay, with a horizon of hills to the extreme right 
and lett and in the back ground. As a vessel advances toward this 
scene an irresistible emotion, influenced by beauty, creeps over the 
soul of the beholder, and as the heart dilates with (piickened i.nlsa- 
tion he feels that words are useless— the vision is sufficient." 



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Alli.'^On the Beach at Long Bram^h. 

On the beach at Marquette, in the summer sun, 
llural charms aie waiting visitors who come 
Seeking healthy pleasure, roaming on the sand, 
Merry waves resounding up and down the strand. 
Boats on wings are sailing 'round about the bay, 
Skift*s are gaily gliding, on a pleasant day, 
Indians often paddling in their bark canoe, 
Romance with rosy fingers paints the charming view. ; 

Air, with balmy pinions, wafts from yonder shore; 
Breezes from the wild woods sipped from many a flower; 
Dashing little streamlets where the waters shout, 
Down beneath the shadows sport the speckled trout; 
SailiniT o'er the waters in a trallant Ooat, 
Salmon trout by dozens catching as you float; 
Hocks, with marks of ages painted on their face- 
Nature's honored sages— loom with stately grace. 

ChoniH. 

We've five hotels and good ones, sparkling, bracing, air. 
Churches seven, and neat ones, for those who enter there; 
By the shore at Manpiette, ])leasant place to stay, 
Since the season opened in the "Charming May." 

Where can often be seen ton u})on ton of solid wealth ar- 
riving from the mines above, gliding along the massive piers, 
and thundering into the vessels lying below, whose snowy 
wings spread anon o'er the cool crystal water— appearing in 
the distance like birds of the ocean— propellers and steamers 
coming and going, streets thronged with smiling-faced visitors, 
making a programme of interest not to be seen everywhere; 
and the lovers of nature who now suffer from the heat of a 
southern sun cannot fail to appreciate the many exhilarating 
attractions which at this season can be found by a ramble 
"On the Beach at Manpiette," iVrc. 




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In my dream last night, I saw a form 
Whose face was dark as the dusky morn, 
Whose symmetry one could but admire— 
'Twas an Indian Chief in his wild attire. 

He stood on a hill of iron ore, . 
And silver lead as a badge he wore. 
In his right, was a migget ot silver white. 
In his left, a mass of copper bright. 

Amethysts, agates, and greenstones, too, 
Shone as bright as the sparkling dew, 
While curiosities around him lay 
Bright as the rainbow, colors as gay. 

He said in accents broken, low, 
" Now, nidjie, if you wish to know 
Where to purchase all such things one 

needs. 
You'll ever find them by calling at Meade." 



THE 






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PROFUSELY EMBELLISHED 



BY . 



NEMO. 



MARQUETTE : 

CHRISTMAS. 

1876. 



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The lake, as a wide-spreading mirror. 

Lay in its frame of briglit green, 
Sleeping one evening at sun-set, 

Tinged with the sky's azure sheen. 
Air, seemed the breath of the zephyr 

Balmily floating along. 
Dancing on emerald pine tops, 

Merrily humming a song. 

Sky. was a brilliant blue color. 

Tinged with a coating of green; • 

Clouds, just dipped in the rainbow 

Never more gorgeous were seen. 
'Twas as tho' millions of roses 

Scattered their petals to dry 
In the pink glow of the sunsliine, 

Over the beautiful sky. 

Yonder, were rich auburn tresses, 

Nestling o'er flgures of gold. 
While Flora, with crimson-tipped bluslies. 

Scattered her treasures untold. 
Here, a huge fiery-like pillar 

Brilliantly towered on high. 
Looking as tho' a volcano 

Had suddenly leaped in the sky. 



Tliere, seemeil an emerald mountain, 

Covered with silvery sheep; 
Down at the base was a fountain — 

Caverns looked rugged and steep. 
Scenery celestial — that sun-set — 

Plainlv portraved on the skv. 
The work of the good, supreme artist, 

Doth the most skillful defy. 

Perhaps, 'twas a gleam of the riches 

Down in the depths of the lake, 
Reflected on the bright sun-l>eams; 

What a grand painting 'twould make! 
Such a magnificent picture 

Could any artist but paint; 
Bright, in the record of ages 

He'd shine— almost as a saint. 

Italy boasts of its sun-sets, 

Heavenly paintings in air; 
Never yet, in any country, 

Ever were colors more rare. 
The author of all, in His goodness, 

Who formed the earth so fair — 
Could we discern it, dispenseth 

Tilings beautiful everywhere. 



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OF THE CITY OF MAI\QUETTE, 



THIS WORK 



Is Respectfully Dedicated, 



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THE AUTHOR. 



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[hese are the Hose that h 



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the Store that Meads keeps. 



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his is the Maid that bought the Hose, 
That hung in the Store that Meads keeps. 



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his is the man with the broken nose, 
That kissed the maid that bought the hose, 
That hung in the store that Meads keeps. 



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his is the Doctor with the elegant clothes, 
That cured the man with the broken nose, 
That kissed the maid that bought the hose, 
That hung in the Store that Meads keeps. 



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[his is the songstress that did propose, 

To charm the doctor with the elegant clothes, 
That cured the man with the broken nose, 
That kissed the maid that bought the hose, 
That hung in the store that Meads keeps. 



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|his is the Parson that then arose, 
To marry the songstress that did propose. 
To charm the doctor with the elegant clothes, 
That cured the man with the broken nose, 
That kissed the maid that bought the hose, 
That hung in the store that Meads keeps. 



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^ears have fled, as the story goes, 
Since the day that the parson arose, 
To marry the songstress that did propose, 
To charm the doctor with the elegant clothes. 
That cured the man with the broken nose, . 
That kissed the maid that bought the hose. 
That hung in the store that Meads keeps. 




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dear, O dear, ^vhat numberless woes ! 
Would be to the world, we may well suppos.e, 
And to the parson that once arose, 
And to the songstress that did propose, 
And to the doctor with the elegant clothes, 
And to the man with the broken nose. 
And to the maid that bought the hose, 
"Were it not for the store that Meads keeps. 



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' ^^ FINIS. ^ 



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T H F 

IROQUOIS AND CHIPPEWAS. 



HISTORICAL FACTS.— BYT. M. 



■iH 



Once powerful nation, Chippewa, 

Tradition tells, in ancient day 

Desceniled from this grand old lake, 

Subduing foes each step they'd take. 

Unversed were they in many a vice 

When./?re tcater, thought so nice 

By some, had never reached these ehores ; 

(Which many a native most adores,) 

When each a nol>le heritage 

Preserved in form and lineage, 

And blessed their tribe with valorous deeds. 

When hunters brought their daily needs, 

When tawny beauties— famed in song— 

Oft roamed the mossy dells among, 

And borrowed radiance from wild flowers, 

And pure as winds that breathe cool showers. 

From Fond du Lac, down to La Pointe 

And Keweenaw, their foes disjoint. 

As sweeping wind.'*, on, on they came, 

Or rushing streams, when fioods of rain, 

Or me'itiug snow-drifts in the spring 

Have raised them high— swept everything. 

The proud and war like Iroquois 

Recoil before them like mere boys ; 

As puppets made of paint and wood 

In grand array, 'twas thus they stood. 

Huge war clubs, bows and arrows, stealth 

And tomahawks, soon sjtoilt their health. 

A youthful squaw while berrying 

Beheld a fleet fast hurryiug 

To reach the Portage entry — 

She knew it was the enemy— 

As timid fawn away she flew. 

And leaping in her light canoe, 

Sped swiftly o'er tlie little lake. 

To friends the fearful news to take. 

Commotion reigned supreme in camp. 

A couucil held, the sudden tramp 

Of hundreds on the sod was heard, 

And shouts that scared both deer and bird. 

Stern vengeance eat upon each brow, 

As down the stream they da.sh, they vow 

Each tomahawk shall send a foe. 

Anon to realms of bliss or woe. 

But wait, the foe in ambush lies, 

(Full certain of a dead surprise,) 

Down where the river narrows, there 

They crouch as beasts within their lair. 

A mighty yell on either side 

The river bursts, as down they glide. 

A flight of arrows bore a sting 

Of death, upon each quivering wiiig. 

As with the spider and the fly, 

They're in the snare, and all must die. 

A net was set, a trap was laid. 

And ere the night-hawk soared, 'tis said 

No throbbing heart, or active brain 

E're moved those warriors red again. 

The Chippewaa again embark 



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Upon their fleet of yellow bark ; 
Now shouting triumph as they sped, 
Now flaunting high the scalps of dead 
Sons of the woods, who'll ne'er return 
To wailing squaws, who'll ceaseless mourn. 
By day they skim the shining lake, 
At night, to silent woods they take ; 
They tish and hunt to gain supplies 
From Nature's store, that near them lies. 
The laugh of victors' war-whoops shrill, 
Soon echo loud from hill to hill ; 
While rumbling beats the nation's drum. 
They eing and jump to turn tum-tum, 
Which terror spreads to all things near, 
The timorous bird, the rambling deer ; 
The crouching lynx, the clumsy bear, 
Shy foxes, wolves, creep from their lair. 
Fine stalwart forms, wiih faces red 
With paint, while feathers decked each head. 
And claws of bruins dangling hung 
Around the necks of chieftiaus young. 
A tomahawk, a scalping knife — 
That's maybe ended many a life. 
While bow and arrow, war-club bent, 
Made up their wild accoutrement. 
A scalp or two hung by the side 
Of some, to Ihem the height of pride. 
A blazing fire the night illumes ; 
The calumet with curling fumes 
Spreads harmony around the sceue; 
For artists 'twas a splendid theme. 
A novel sight were it to-day, 
A host like that in wild array ; 
Plumed, painted, tattoed— long black hair- 
Now shouting war ciics in the air, 
Some dancing to the god of wars, 
And drumming to the fiery Mars ; 
Some lishing, hunting, playing ball. 
All lounging when night's shadow falls. 
There's Wa-gua-miu-na, 0-ta-dan — 
Young braves who never flinched or ran — 
Tall Wa-ua-ta-gon, Kin-ka-doo ; 
Each crushing blow they struck they slew. 
Still on they go— sail, paddle and row 
Towards the Sault, that lies below ; 
When by and-by, ere set the sun. 
They reach high "Grosscap" one by one. 
And soon, now comes the " tng of war," 
The Iroquois' stronghold not far 
Below them lies, oft vanquished foes. 
Black hate hath stirred revengeful throes. 
And raised to gall their savage ire, 
And set ablaze their native fire. 
Ye conquering heroes, Chippewas ; 
Who, by the force of nature's laws. 
Decrees, it seems, that might is right, 
Have now no abject foes to fight; 
And well aware of such stern facts, 
The medicine man, who ever acts 



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0l*II" 



The Iroquois and CuipptwAS. — Continued. 



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As prophet, and who Intercedes 

To Maoltou in all their needs, 

Invokes his unknown deity 

For succor in Infinity. 

His sacred sanctum sanctorum 

Receives this wise old sagje ; not one 

Now dares approach his hallowed form, 

E'en iho' he pleads from night till morn. 

White buckskin pelts spread o'er his tent; 

In humble form, with figure bent, 

He prayed as one in wild despair 

That One above would hear his prayer. 

He asked, as thousands often do, 

The power to make his foes to rue, 

And wished that every warrior brave 

Might slay a foe his friends to save ; 

That fleecy clouds, both thick and white, 

Might rise to hide them all from sight ; 

That they, unseen by vigil eyep, 

Might suddenly their foes surprise. 

The power of prayer's exemplified. 

Unless their history has lied, 

For on the tent's rude covering 

In rapid taps began to ring 

Loud raps ; as swiftly, too, they came 

As pelting hall or driven rfin. 

And each sound was, the spirit said, 

A foeman's life, a spirit fled. 

A dense fog-cloud arose that night, 

That veiled the moon and stars so bright. 

Then rose the sage — a ray of joy 

Shone o'er his face as when a boy. 

He beckoned each brave to his side, 

And bid them cheer in tones of pride. 

The Maniton, be said, had told 

Him, Iroquois— both young and old — 

Should, ere returned the morning light, 

Be in the land that knows no night. 

AcrooS upon the other side, 

"Where ebbs and flows the gentle tide, 

A powerful host, in dread array, 

Awaited for the light of day. 

The Chippewas, more wary, bold, 

Beneath the shade of fog, 'tis told, 

Soon sailed out in bark canoes — 

Success Is theirs, they 'vantage chose. 

Then some above, and some below, 

As still as death ashore they go 

Into the woods, no sound or noise 

Awakes the dreamy Iroquois. 

As snakes upon the ground they sneak 

Or tigers crouching for a leap, 

They presently again unite 

Behind their foes, caressed by night. 

O brave, unconscious warriors 

Entranced in slumber, many years 

The scouige of many a tawny tribe. 

Who'd oft beseeching looks deride. 

No more your conquering ft et shall tread. 

Wild, painted braves among the dead ; 

No more the friendly calumet 

You'll need, or will around it sit ! 

(The night was hushed, no sound was heard, 

Not e'en the leaflt-ts soft winds stirred, 

Nor playful ripples kissed the bhore. 

Serenely rolling o'er and o'er. ) 

Upon their sandy beds they lay, 

A little host, a nation they ; 

The boast, the picked ones of their tribe— 

Once powerful savage people's pride. 

On them, gray twilight's mantle spread 

A pall, to cover o'er the dead. 



Before them lay the crystal Inke, 
Behind them foes, their lives to take, 
bright dew drops decked half covered forms, 
A robe of pelts their chief adorns. 
With beads and paint they look so wild. 
True type of many a forest child. 
Sleep, calmly sleep, 'I will be your lost ! 
Dream fond adieux, your day 's most past ! 
No more you'll gladden anxious eyes 
With game or scalps, or foes surprise. 
A spring! a bound ! unearthly yells 
As if from Hades, vengeance tells ! 
The astonished Iroquois from sleep 
Arose, as when poor, helpless sheep 
Are set upon by wolves ; and ere 
They'd time to rally, many were 
Dispatched to happy hunting grounds, 
With those who're buried 'neath high mounds. 
Ah, then ensued a fearful strife— 
As lions struggling life for life- 
Fierce grappling, rending, crushing blows. 
Now dealing death strokes, butchering foee. 
The work was short, 'twas quickly done— 
As rose again the golden sun 
Behind the clouds that ope the^day — 
Whose rosy fingers paint each ray — 
A sight appalling met the eye. 
Poor Iroquois in death all lie 

Save one, deprived of ears and nose. 

Who down the river swiftly goes 

To bear the message to bis friends, 

The taunting Chippewa now sends ; 

" When m*n you'd fight with, such as we. 

Send men to fight ns ; never be 

Such fools again ; good sense you lack. 

To send out women on our track." 

They spread the skulls along the shore ; 

'TIS said they reached a mile or more. 

But for the truth of this I'll not 

E'en vouch, tho' olt I've seen the spot. 

But bones lies scattered here and there 

Along the beach ; the very air 

Seems laden with the walling tone 

Of dying men who breathe a moan. 

Thus, where the lighthouse now doth stand. 

Beside the point of yellow sand ; 

Where troubled waves with swellmg noise 

Oft murmur, stands Point Iroquoia. 

With such a sweeping victory, 

Now all elate they shout with glee. 

And dashing down the crystal stream 

In bark canoes — as If by steam — 

Soon reached the spot now called "the Soo," 

And put to fliifht the helpless few. 

They made that pleasant place their home. 

And from their stronghold hunt and roam. 

And even to the present day. 

Their oflfsprlng thither love to stay. 

A moral in my narrative 

Appears quite plainly — while we live 

Let caution, and sagacity. 

With soul determined, ever be 

Our motto; and the hands should strike 

The golden chances met through life ; 

And then, as checkered Fortune's wheel 

Turns on Its axip, we may feel 

The friendly hand of good success, 

Behold her smiling face, unless 
Life's stormy, ragintr billows rise 
To sink our bark before it lies 
Serenely in Hope's sunnv port. 

Behind the ramparts of her fort. 
Tho' fortune pmiles on but the few, 

"Act well our part," whate'er we do. 



THE PIONEER I EXPLORER 

(SUPPOSED TO BE HIS FIRST TRIP.) 



A pioneer with axe in hand, 

A blanket, pick and gun, 
A little food, to search the land, 

Starts with the rising sun. 
Id fancy's dream, before him lies 

A mine of shining gold, 
Of silver, copper, iron— some prize 

Producing wealth untold. 

When evening shadows gather 'round, 

And Flora paints the west; 
When spotted fawns a place have found 

Beneath some bush tu rest ; 
When gentle winds a vesper sigh, 

And le:iflets catch the tone ; 
When swallows swift are soaring high 

And wild beasts love to roam; 
Beside some green and shady nook, 

Where scarce a sound is heard, 
Save music of a babbling brook 

Or chirp of friendly bird, 
A dancing fire with curling flames. 

At evening might be seen ; 
Sparks soaring through the waving plumes 

Of nature's locks so green. 

A bunch of boughs spread o'er the mould; 

His bpacious tent the skies, 
Beneath some tree, though nights are cold, 

Upon the brush he lies. 
He quaffs the solace of his pipe 

And marks the smoke arise, 
Till poudering o'er hU future life, 

He siiuts his weary eyes. 
Though slumber hovers o'er him now 

His thoughts cease not to roam. 
As balos circling 'round his brow 

Arc happy dreams of home. 

A stealthy lynx creeps up to sec, 

A wolf is prowling there; 
A bear walks up and steals, may be, 

Some food that's lying near. 
He wakes to bear the black thief run. 

As bushes part and crack ; 
Too late he hastens with bis gun 

To bring the bruin back. 
The morn arrives, the day 's begun. 

He takes an early meal, 
And gladdened by the golden sun 

His thoughts are thoughts of weal. 
Each rivulet with eagle eye 

He scans, tho' yet in vain. 
And searches every blnCE near by — 

fie looks and looks again 
To find some precious treasure, which 

For ages has beeu hid 
Beneath the soil, to make him rich, 

Will fortune now forbid ? 

Each morning comes, each evening goes. 
Yet naught but rocks and trees 

E'er greet his eyes — as fancy fiows— 
No, naught of worth be sees. 

Fond Hope soon leaves him there, alone. 



Success, too, droops its head ; 
His food, too, now is almost gone; 

Hark ! what was that be said ? 
" My comp.'^ss gone, I've lost my way ! 

My feet, alas ! how sore ! 
i bitterly regret the day 

I left my cottage door." 

With drooping head and weaiy limbs 

He sits him down to rest. 
While hunger chides as evening flings 

Its shadows o'er the west. 
No compass now — no sun to ehiue, 

Nor moss about the trees ; 
The hours pass on, he heeds no time, 

'lis naught but woe he sees. 

He wanders on but knows not where, 

His brain begins to swim, 
And feelings, touched with dark despair 

Soon close his eyes, grown dim. 
He dreams of home, the tender child. 

And sees it smile and play, 
When darkness stays its rompings wild 

He hears it sweetly pray. 
He marks the sad look of his wife. 

Beholds her on her knees 
Imploring One to spare his life — 

Brave thoughts bis feelings seize. 
As when a sleeping giant hears 

The sound of foeman's tread. 
So he arose and left his fears 

AH on his leafy bed. 

Cheered on by thrifty energy, 
While gaining strength anew, 

Sound reason gave him back the key 
To search the forest through. 

See ! yonder comes, with gentle gait, 

A "Monarch of the Glen ; " 
And now 'b the lime ; if he'll but wait 

A moment more, and then— 
(An echo wakes each slumbering bill. 

As when in battle plain 
A lonely picket in some rill 

Is by a foeman slain,) 
He aims, though trembling sore, and fires, 

A leap into the air ! 
And presently a deer expires; 

His food, bis life is there ! 
Encouraged now by good success, * * •* 

The sun, too, shming bright, '*,' 

He hastes to leave the wilderness, „ , , 

And sets his course aright. \ 






> > 

3 » 






• •• • ', 



While passing down a deep ravine, , ,,.,••, 

With craggy rocks, and high, ' **••*.*•* 

There, glimmering in the sun's bright shfew*,* '•»' ' ' 

A something caught his eye ; 
He scrambles up the steep to see 

If aught of worth is there ; 
" Look ! by the powers al>ove," quoth he, 

" Eureka ! see, 'tis here ! " 
He feasts his eyes and picks about 



B 



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THE PIONEER AND EXPLORER— Continued. 



For samples of the ore ; 
At times A wild, triumphant about 

R\Bf^B out the forest o'er ; 
Then Alls his sack, and blazes back 

A line, as on he goes, 
That ho may soon retrace his track — 

His heart with raptnre glows! 

As when a f!;allant soldier leaves 

The battle field behind. 
When foes are as the fallen leaves. 

He hastens home to And 
Rejoicing friends, glad welcoming 

Their hero home again ; 
So he returned, now triumphing 

O'er hardships fraught with pain. 
A meeting — well, the dews of heaven 

Encircled them once more; 
The blessings of a home were given, 

With comfort, as before. 



Where once an aged forest stood 

Now waves the golden Krain, 
And smiling farms, where grew the wood, 

Adorn each hill and plain. 
Perhaps a thriving city now 

Is on the very spot 
Where first his camp fire spread its glow 

Around his leafy cot. 
A benefactor to his race. 

To hardships well inured. 
Fond memory will oft retrace 

The trials he endured. 

A lesson good, it seems to me. 

Is by this woodsman taught. 
His trip into the forest free, 

That's with adventure Iraught; 

If, in life's rough and thorny way, 

We set our course aright. 
We'll find perhaps some future day, 

A home that's beaming bright 



One night, as the rays of 

The liHiht were retiring. 
And Nature grown weary, 

Was hastening to rest; 
A poor widow sat, bowed with 

Grief— sad and weeping — 
As three little cherubs 

With hunger were pressed. 

The air, O, how cold! as 

The wind fiercely whistled 
Iq anger, and crept through 

Each seam in the fioor: 
No fuel! and the bright glowing 

Embers were dying. 
As the "woll" lay in waiting 

To spring— at the door. 

Next morning, a friend of 
The friendless and needy — 

A kindred of Charity- 
Thought of the poor; 

And cheered the sad widow 
With food, and with fuel, 

And gathered a blessing- 
Nor missed from bis store. 

• • t « 

Those ♦ho lend to destitute widows 
andorplianswlir reap their reward with 
a hundred. ft>ld, Interest in the "great 
hereafter.'! i^ .. ; 



'Twas down by the banks of a 

Musical stream, 
Where green grasses grov and 

Trout may be seen; 
Beneath the warm sun I 

Wandered one day, 
To learn what this rolicking 

Brook had to say. 

It said, as it merrily 

Rippled along, 
*'A gem of the forest, my 

Heart full of song. 
I'm up in the wild woods, 

Down on the shore. 
Leaping and bounding with 

Glee evermore. 

'Tis here that sweet maidens and 

Swains often meet. 
And gather the wild flowers that 

Grow at my feet, 
And whisper of joys jet in 

Store as they roam, 
And dream of the bliss that 

Surrounds a new home. 

I sometimes inform a young 

Twain, ere they go— 
Thatls, ifthey donot 

Already know — 



Where they can purchase most 

All things one needs, 
Of course, it is down by the 

Corner— at Meads'." 



SW Sa\ Wv\Wvxv We 

She sat within the cabin, 

Beside the open door, 
Her graceful form reclining; 

Her thoughts began to soar 
In soft, melodious cadence. 

As o'er the waters bright. 
The enllant ship was gliding 

Into the silent night. 

A vision bright came o'er ber — 

She thought that it was day. 
And every thing around her 

Looked curious and gay; 
Rich specimens, and barkwork, 

And slippers worked with beads 
And when her eyes were opened, 

She found 'twas in at Meads'. 



Onward, e'er onward! nor think of the 

past; 
The present is here it cannot long last, 
Then seize it, and gather jits fruit ere 

it dies. 
The future may then bring a pleasant 

surprise. 



1— 1 1 .-.rrr; 



Goc(f. sfpck of Choice Confectionery. A fne assortment of Greenstone (Chloras- 
trolyte) Jewelry, manufactured in the Store, consisting of full sets. Rings, Sleeve 
Buttons, Studs, Pins, &c. Also native Silver Jewelry at the News Depot 






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-♦^►♦- 



ONE PRICE GASH STORE 



Fashionable Millinery 

CONSISTING OF 

Shade Hats, Bonnets, Hats, Caps, Flowers, 

Feathers, liibbons. Laces, Ornaments, Velvets, 

Silks, Illusions, Veilings, &c., &c., &c., &c. 

He Isieeps anoaae TD"u.t tlxe "best of Triirnnaers, 

And guarantees all Millinery work done to compare with any eastern city, in style, quality 

and pnces. 




Gloves, Hosiery, Belts, Handkerchiefs, Combs, 

Portmonaies, Soaps, Brushes, Perfumery, Baskets, 

Ruchmgs, Ties, Collars, Cuffs, Yarns, 

Zephyrs, Canvas, Filling Silks, Card Board, Parasols, 

Jewelry, Edgings, Embroideries, Buttons, Bibs, 
Puffings, Tucking, Corsets, Worsted Patterns, Fans, 

Gimps, Real Hair Switches, Fringes, and everything else. 

Li^DIES' LiNEfl SJiyS, Sl|\WL8, S/^CQIIeS \ND SKiP^fS. 



Black and Colored Silks, Alpacas, Poplnis, Serges, Cre tones. 

Cashmeres, Percales, Picques, Prints, Cottons, 

Linens, Suitings, Flannels, <fec., &c. 



EVERYONE SHOULD VISIT JACESOJPS BAZAR, AS HE KEEPS THE 

most complete stock of Ladies'' Eiirnishing Goods in the county. Anything 
new in the market will always he foxind at Jackson's, and at the lowest cash prices. 

Everyone knows where Jackson's is. . 

Marquette, L. S., Mich. 



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MARQUETTE, MICH., 



IWahJp^ctJv Kf^ SfiLL Mifliflq and BlaspHQ Powdei^. 



JAY V. MOUSE, PreHidevi. 



C. H. CALL, Sev^y ami Treasurer, 



H. B-A.E.2srES 



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) Marquette Office, ( 



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Front Strkkt. 
OppoMite Coszt-u'it HouHf, 





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r3i3::E=^E25v^iiNro- o.-e^i^ic 



At the BARNUM MOUSE, First and Third Weeks of E<ich Month, 



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FREEMAN & BRO., PROPR'S 



^^stLian.g: ^Parties S"a.pplied. TTv^-tli Ooa:iT7-e3ra.nces 
ain-d. CS-TjLicies to tlie lOest lE^istLiaag: 0-ro"a.nd.s. 

TmtriHtM lyxitiinj Mdrqacfh- mr tnr'ded to roll nnd examine our 8tocl\ ami can rest atusvred 

that their vntts ntn he full tf complied with at all hoarx. 



Authorized Capital, $300,000. ; Incorporated under the Laws of the 
Capital paid in, - 1 oO.COO. ) State of Michigan. 

MARQUETTE, MICH., 



C3rp"icx:se. 

Ambkomk CAMPKKi.r.. i'n't r. 

R»WMU> BuirrsN). Vi'- i'm'i. t'Kku. M. .Sisai.n. A«>'t i'm*hifr 



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XJISa ECTOiaS : 



I. M. Wilkinson. Caoliitrr. • Ambbosk Campbrll, J. K. Cask, J. A. Tbkat. S. Aoaxh 

Kbw*bd Rkkitdng. J. M. Wilkixsoh, T. B. Bkooks. 



Sells 



^::3^, Sickford. 3c Oo's Oele"brated. Safet3r 

IF^ijLse- 



f-u-ll 3'a.ppl3r a.lT77-a.3rs 02:^ Ixaaad- axid. ord.ers 
^rcm tlie irnines -pTorrrptl-y filled.. 



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MARQUETTE, MICH., Dealer in 

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Fine Toilej Soa^s, Bi^Js(|es, QofXBS^ Eye. 

Fancy Articles, Perfumery in Great Variety, Pure Brandy, ^Vines 

and Liquors for Medicinal Purposes. 

Physieiam' Prescriptions Carefully Dlspemed. Opposite the Store that Meads keeps. 




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This House is delightfully situated (Lake Street, Marquette,) on the shore of the bay, in among 

a cluster ot pines, with a view stretching far out into the lake; is first class in 

every particular, and an excellent resort for tourists, pleasure seekers and invalids. 

FARM HAM LYON, Proprietor. 



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UNDER McVICKER'S THEATRE, Q H I O -A_ Gt O. 



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Svi\k,e>fVo>f §\>f<te\, 



^a>pcxvve\\e, 1L. S., "NVvcXv, 



MRS. ARMSTRONG, Proprietress. 



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WETHORE & BRO., 

Adams' l^VocVt, "V^vowX S\vee\, >^aYc\ue\\e, 

ioiltr in f (aney 







QeNJS' pUt\NISljlNq Qo@DS, Gl^OCKEff^Y; 

Staple and Fancy Groceries, Hay Grain and Feed. 

PARTICULAR ATTENTION 






*>4e\x> "Sw^o^vcs. 



\7"e]:e^ 



JOSHUA CULBERT 

HjlS THE L/RGEST Ap BEST STOCK OF HORSES 



03JT ar^CE xrXTEia -grB^bn-NrgiTT T. A 



SUPERIOR STREET, MARQUETTE, MICH. 



HERMAN R. HADRICH 




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MARQUETTE, L. S., MICH. 



Solid Gold and Silver Jewelry of all kinds made to order. Jewelry of all hinds repaired 
on short notice. Everything Warranted to give entire satisfaction. 



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Statio3aer37 , X^alsie S-ciperior TT^ie^^^s, c5cc. 

FRONT sritEKT. 

C«X)1 Scxlaand Mineral Water drawn iVoiu Tut'tV - It..»U'rick " Fountain. 



COZZEI^'8 HOTEL. 

Corner WaHhiu^fon om/ Front Sfr'^'tx* 

EL.. S., ^^10X31- 



Arranged and conducted to meet the re(juirem«;nts and tas^tes ot" all, the tourist, the invalid 

an<l the ltUKiru'»H man. 

JOHN r. W. THOMAS, Propr. 



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T-A-ls/£ES ^IC3i:-A-2^3DS dc Co., 



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HEAVY HARDWARE, 



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MINING AND RAILWAY SUPPLIES, 

Bar, Bntul and Sheet Iron, Nail, Spike, Nats and Washerx, Knylish and Amerii-an 
Sted, das Pipe, and Steam Fittijigx. Stoim Horn, Swtion Hose, Hydrant Ho»e. 
Miners' Handles, liuhher, Hnnp, S'^oyxtime and Empire J*acking, Oih, 
Collage, Waste. Wire Rope, Leads, Paints, G!a^f<, Earl's Canier- 
on's, Knowle's, ami Blake's Steam Pumps, Puheometer or Ma- 
gee Pump, Fail-hank's Svali's, HaJVs Safes. E'i re Brick, 
Fire Clay, Salanian<ler Filling, ifec. 



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H IS PICTURES ARE U N Rt VALfiD. 



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COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY LIBRARIES 

This book is due on the date indicated below, or at the 
expiration of a definite period after the date of borrowing, as 
provided by the rules of the Library or by special arrange- 
ment with the Librarian in charge. 



COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 




0032052286 



rD2S4.5 



If46 



DATE ■ORROWKO 


OATK DUE 


DATE BONROWCD 


DATE DUE 


ju« t -m'. 


1 
> 






DE 


t 1 1956 












1 
















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1 
















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The store that Meads keeps. 1876, 



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MAY u 3 1394 



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TITLE